Samples released from the Future Health Group

Over our 18 year history, we have released 118 clients samples for clinical applications from both our UK and Swiss facilities.

Here you can find examples of these releases, what they were used for and how our gold industry standard processing method plays a vital role in our ability to release successful stem cell samples.

We’ve released over 100 samples across the globe

When: 2008
Where: North America
Sample type: Cord blood
Released for: Cerebral Palsy – a degenerative muscle condition that affects movement and coordination. It is caused by developmental problems in the brain during or soon after birth. This sample was released for a clinical trial at Duke Medical Centre into improving motor function in children with CP.

When: 2018
Where: North America
Sample type: Cord blood
Released for: Autism – or autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a developmental disorder that appears in early childhood, with no clear cause. It is characterized by repetitive behaviours, challenges with social skills and non-verbal communication. This cord blood sample was shipped to Duke University as part of a pioneering clinical trial into the treatment of children with Autism.

When: 2016
Where: North America
Sample type: Tooth stem cells
Released for: Regeneration of knee cartilage – when the connective cartilage tissue in the knee joints becomes damaged and weak, causing joint pain, stiffness and inflammation. This tooth stem cell sample was released to a private medical clinic for personalized therapy.

When: 2012
Where: Jordan
Sample type: Cord blood
Released for: Fanconi Anaemia – A rare inherited anaemia that mainly affects bone marrow, due to a shortage in all types of blood cells. This sample was successfully used to treat a young boy at King Hussein Cancer Centre in Jordan.

When: 2013
Where: Europe
Sample type: Cord blood
Released for: Diamond Blackfan Anaemia – an inherited syndrome causing bone marrow failure to produce red blood cells. It results in patients becoming severely anemic. The cord blood sample was released to a specialist clinic in Greece, to replace and regenerate red blood cells in patients with this condition.

When: 2015
Where: Jordan
Sample type: Cord blood
Released for: Beta Thalassemia Major – this blood disorder reduces production of haemoglobin and iron-containing proteins, leading to a lack of oxygen in parts of the body. This sample was successfully transplanted at King Hussein Cancer Centre in Jordan.

When: 2016
Where: North America
Sample type: Tooth stem cells
Released for: Diabetes Type 1, Type 2 – a condition that either limits the pancreas’s ability to produce insulin, or stops it all-together. Type 2 is often milder than Type 1, known as non-insulin dependent diabetes. This tooth stem cell sample was released to a private medical clinic for personalized therapy.

When: 2014
Where: Israel
Sample type: Cord blood
Released for: SCID (Severe Combined Immunodeficiency) – This defines a group of rare immunodeficiency disorders that leave the patient defenseless against bacteria and infections. In this transplant, Hematopoietic stem cells in this cord blood sample differentiated into healthy blood cells and platelets to replenish the patient’s immune system.

When: 2017
Where: North America
Sample type: Tooth stem cells
Released for: Autism – or autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a developmental disorder that appears in early childhood, with no clear cause. It is characterized by repetitive behaviours, challenges with social skills and non-verbal communication. This tooth stem cell sample was released to a private medical clinic for personalized therapy.

How are released samples used in treatment?

Stem cells are at the forefront of regenerative medicine.

HSCs, found in cord blood, are used as part of standard hospital treatments in over 85 diseases and conditions.

MSCs, found in cord tissue and teeth, are widely regarded as a significant part of healthcare advancement and are present in over 1,000 clinical trials in addition to over 50,000 scientific publications.

Once the stem cells have been transplanted into the patient, the stem cells then transform into a range of blood, muscle, tissue and nerve cells as required to regenerate the tissue or help with the treatment.

For a released sample to be successfully transplanted and treat these diseases, it must reach specific and strict criteria, established by the regulatory authorities and licensing bodies, to make it viable.

What makes a sample viable?

The viability of a sample at the final stage of transplant is dependent on one of the earliest stages of storage; processing the sample before it has been frozen.
Transplantation is the final stage of a stored stem cell sample. However, whether it is viable or not is dependent on the earliest stages. Before the sample has been frozen it must be processed and confirmed viable.

Every biobank has a choice of processing method available to them and over the last 18 years, we have concentrated our time and resources to perfect a unique processing method that delivers up to 99% cell recovery rates pre-freeze.

The higher the stem cell count, the better quality the sample as this is what determines viability at time of transplant.

Our industry approved processing method involves reducing the size of the sample and is the preference of most reputable biobanks. Although it can take time and money this method ensures that each and every sample achieves the highest possible cell count and that even a small amount of blood can be processed.

We are proud that this processing method is the industry gold standard and have released more than any other UK bank. This not only demonstrates the viability and effectiveness of our stored samples, but we know what a released sample means for every family that has had to request a sample.

Case study

One of our most recent released sample was to treat a three-year old girl for cerebral palsy, using her baby brother’s cord blood stem cells. After finding out about the pioneering clinical trials into cerebral palsy at Duke University, USA, the family decided to release the cord blood sample for potential treatment. It took less than one week for her sample to be released and received by Duke University Hospital, where the stem cells were successfully infused. The girl’s mother said that despite extensive research into potential treatment, this stem cell infusion was the family’s only viable option. She spoke to Future Health about her experience in storing with us: ‘We heard about Future Health on the internet after a lot of research online. All of the services provided were an excellent experience. Professional staff, very available, fast answers by email and phone, very pleasant, efficient and paying close attention to your needs.’

Our Customer Care team are on hand for any questions that you may have